Need to find socket that goes with Buddy spark plug

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phenomenalworld
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Need to find socket that goes with Buddy spark plug

Post by phenomenalworld »

Can someone kindly point me to a link for the kind of socket I need to change a spark plug on my 2012 Buddy 125? I know it is not a normal plug, but elongated, customized for a spark plug, but of the rest I claim ignorance. Thank you.
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babblefish
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Post by babblefish »

There is nothing abnormal about the C7HSA spark plug used in the Buddy 125/150. Use a regular 5/8" spark plug socket to remove and install. Available at any Sears or automotive parts store.
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DeeDee
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Post by DeeDee »

Go to Harbor Freight and buy this socket, it has a rubber insert that grips the plug: https://www.harborfreight.com/38-in-dri ... 67792.html

Also pick up an 8" socket extension. https://www.harborfreight.com/38-in-dri ... 67792.html

Be sure you start the plug off on the same angle it came out. Carefully start it by hand (turning the extnesion and socket by hand) and only use your hand until you get 2 or 3 solid full turns. Then tighten it down gently until it stops with the ratchet, then go another half turn to snug it down.

It is real easy to cross thread a plug if you are not careful.
phenomenalworld
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Post by phenomenalworld »

Thanks for both of your responses. I'm a bit confused because you, babblefish, say that a regular 5/8" spark plug socket will do the trick, but you, DeeDee, are saying I need an 8" socket extension. Otherwise, this is very good intel and has set me very well on my way towards full enlightenment on the issue.
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DeeDee
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Post by DeeDee »

This might help your confusion:
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babblefish
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Post by babblefish »

DeeDee wrote:This might help your confusion:
The black thing is the 8" extension and the round shiny thing is the spark plug socket...

Plus, all sockets meant for spark plugs that I've run across has a rubber insert to grab the spark plug so if you don't have a Harbor Freight nearby, just get any spark plug socket. Note: it has to say it's a spark plug socket or else it won't have the rubber insert. Getting the spark plug out of a Buddy with a socket that doesn't have the insert is a pain in the rear. Well, it's not horrible, but easier with the right tool.
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phenomenalworld
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Post by phenomenalworld »

I see, I see. So an 8 inch extension is a mandatory and collaborative part of the tool needed. Nothing shorter will do? I wanna keep it in my box of carry-along necessities for longer road trips, but would much prefer to have something more compact. This is the length of the kind that comes in a basic Buddy tool kit?
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Post by cummingsjc »

phenomenalworld wrote:I see, I see. So an 8 inch extension is a mandatory and collaborative part of the tool needed. Nothing shorter will do? I wanna keep it in my box of carry-along necessities for longer road trips, but would much prefer to have something more compact. This is the length of the kind that comes in a basic Buddy tool kit?
You could probably leave the spark plug socket and extension at home. I doubt that you will ever really need to change a spark plug out on a road trip if you do it periodically at home. If the scooter is running correctly, spark plugs generally last quite a few miles. Save the space and weight for something more useful, like a tire plug repair kit and an adjustable crescent wrench (for tightening your mirrors).
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Post by phenomenalworld »

well that’s a refreshing perspective and understanding - leave the socket & extension at home. Sounds great! I’ll bring just the spark plug, no biggie, and can always try to finagle the tools from a mechanic shop if the dire need should occur.
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Post by cummingsjc »

phenomenalworld wrote:well that’s a refreshing perspective and understanding - leave the socket & extension at home. Sounds great! I’ll bring just the spark plug, no biggie, and can always try to finagle the tools from a mechanic shop if the dire need should occur.
Am I missing something? Why not just install the new spark plug at home and not have to carry any of it with you? As I said, generally spark plugs don't just fail. This is not meant as a criticism, I'm just curious as to why you feel that you need to carry a spark plug with you on your scooter. I've never heard of anyone doing that.
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Post by jrsjr »

I bet I know what happened. I'm guessing somebody was talking about two-stroke scooters (the Genuine Stella 2-Stroke) where it's a good idea to have a plug wrench (and spare plug) and that caused a misunderstanding.
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Post by cummingsjc »

jrsjr wrote:I bet I know what happened. I'm guessing somebody was talking about two-stroke scooters (the Genuine Stella 2-Stroke) where it's a good idea to have a plug wrench (and spare plug) and that caused a misunderstanding.
Your explanation would make lots of sense if that was a common necessary item on 2T Stella scooters. On the modern Genuine Scooters (Buddies, Hooligans, etc) it would seem to be wasted space and weight. Being as I have virtually no experience with Stella scooters you have me intrigued as to why someone would need to carry around a spare spark plug and accessories as a necessary piece of kit. Do they foul the plugs that quickly/badly? Why the 2T Stella scoots and not other 2T scoots like the Roughhouse or Buddy 50? Does this apply to older PX Vespas also?
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Post by phenomenalworld »

So what it was was, I found, both on this site, and maybe another site, different people giving their list of essential "Long Ride Items" needed or recommended to bring. Among several different people's list is an extra spark plug. From there, and after my initial newbie research on the ins and out of spark plugs, I learned I was going to need a tool to install the spark plug, and here I am and here we are.
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Post by jd »

Back in the day when people were riding two-stroke mopeds with an oily 32:1 gasoline-to-oil mixture, it was possible to foul a plug if your bike wasn't running properly. I think I replaced a plug on the road once or twice in those days.

When synthetic two-stroke oil became more widely available and the mix went to 50:1, plug fouling became less frequent.

With a four-stroke engine, I don't see any reason to carry an extra plug at all. In any case, it's not as though it's a difficult plug to find in any auto parts store.
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Post by k1dude »

phenomenalworld wrote:So what it was was, I found, both on this site, and maybe another site, different people giving their list of essential "Long Ride Items" needed or recommended to bring. Among several different people's list is an extra spark plug.
Perhaps some "long ride" context was missed.

For an adventure rider deep in the backcountry or in another country altogether, especially a 3rd world one, an extra spark plug would be an essential item.

For 30 miles across town, it isn't.
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Post by scootERIK »

Buddies come with a spark plug tool in the yellow tool pouch that is rubber banded to the underside of the seat. There is also a standard and phillips screwdriver in there. Unless you bought a used scooter and the previous owner kept it.

I have had a spark plug start to fail while out on a ride, I was ~70 miles into a ~330 mile trip. At the time I didn't know it was the spark plug. The scooter still ran but it would bog during hard acceleration, so I was able to finish the ride. The plug had about 12,000 miles on. Easy solution is to change your plug every 5-8 thousand miles. You also want to change the spark plug cap every 8-10k, or carry an extra one. OR you can carry enough zip ties to go all the way around the motor to hold the cap on(I have done this twice while out on the road, one of those was in a parking lot right before I was to lead a ride with about 50 scooters.)

I try to always have an extra spark plug and spark plug cap under my seat. Plus I carry enough tools to fix most of the problems I have run into, and I am slowly adding more tools as needed.
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Post by BuddyRaton »

cummingsjc wrote:
jrsjr wrote:I bet I know what happened. I'm guessing somebody was talking about two-stroke scooters (the Genuine Stella 2-Stroke) where it's a good idea to have a plug wrench (and spare plug) and that caused a misunderstanding.
Being as I have virtually no experience with Stella scooters you have me intrigued as to why someone would need to carry around a spare spark plug and accessories as a necessary piece of kit. Do they foul the plugs that quickly/badly? Why the 2T Stella scoots and not other 2T scoots like the Roughhouse or Buddy 50? Does this apply to older PX Vespas also?
The PX series are actually relatively new models. Two stroke scooters burn a fuel oil mixture. Synthetic 2T oils help a lot in keeping plugs cleaner...but...you're still getting a lot more carbon buildup than a 4T motor. A spare plug weighs an ounce or two and takes up almost no room. The Buddy tool kit has a plug wrench if I remember correctly.

Running in a motor I always star with 500-1000 miles on dino oil running rich to keep tems down. If it costs me 3 bucks for a plug to break it in right that's OK.

On cross country runs such as the CBR I have "cheated". For days with big altitude changes I will sometimes run up to 6% oil to lean out the mixture for high altitude (7-10k feet). Yeah...it might foul a plug but it is much easier to change a plug than to rejet the carb and get it dialed back in.

A spare plug is the least of what I carry on vintage. I always have cables, a spare tube (if running tubed tires and no spare), hand air pump, 7mm 8mm wrenches, plug/lug wrench along with a bunch of other stuff and tools.
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Post by phenomenalworld »

k1dude, i did mention the “long ride� midpoint in the thread. i will be riding from los angeles to san francisco, and maybe return by way of yosemite. there’s some backcountry there, of sorts, considering my 125cc scoot can’t ride the interstate.

Erik, indeed bought my scoot used and so no yellow tool pouch. good to know how often to change the plug. this buddy 125cc is 2012, only had 1300 miles on it when i bought it two months ago, and have already doubled that, but since plenty to go before iI’ll need to plug in a new plug.
Last edited by phenomenalworld on Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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jd
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Post by jd »

phenomenalworld wrote:k1dude, i did mention the “long ride� midpoint in the thread. i will be riding from los angeles to san francisco, and maybe return by way of yosemite. there’s some backcountry there, of sorts, considering my 125cc scoot can’t ride the interstate, but it’s not third world, although certainly parts of this country are becoming more third world-eque by the day, but that’s a different matter...

Erik, indeed bought my scoot used and so no yellow tool pouch. good to know how often to change the plug. this buddy 125cc is 2012, only had 1300 miles on it when i bought it two months ago, and have already doubled that, but since plenty to go before iI’ll need to plug in a new plug.
The tools in that pouch are garbage, anyway. Better to have new ones.
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