Moving beyond 50cc

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TTaM
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Moving beyond 50cc

Post by TTaM »

We've had our Buddy 50 for the better part of the decade now. When we first bought it, my wife was using it for commuting in Minneapolis. We have now moved to Olympia, WA, and the 50cc is seeing less road time. My wife's commute is no longer scooter comparable, and for errands the 50 really struggles with the hills.

When we bought the Buddy, a major attraction for us was my wife was comfortable on it with her 4'11" frame. Since we're looking for a larger displacement scoot now, we're including the larger Buddies in our search.

Is the setup similar on the larger ones?

Also, is there a general consensus at to what is the best, the 125, 150, or 170i?
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DeeDee
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Post by DeeDee »

I've owned a 50, a 125 and a 170i. Size wise you won't be able to tell the difference. Loved my 125. Thought it was a better bike than the 170i. Dollar for dollar, the 125 is the best scooter out there.
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babblefish
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Post by babblefish »

I like my 150. It has a little bit of extra torque and horsepower vs a 125 to make it up some of the hills here in San Francisco. You'll probably find a better deal on a 125 though.
Some people can break a crowbar in a sandbox.
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BayStateScooterist
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Post by BayStateScooterist »

I ride a Buddy 150 and my wife rides a Buddy 125. The 150 does have the extra pep for hills and top speed (~65 MPH), plus it's freeway legal, for short trips though. The Buddy 170 should be able to top those figures.
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Post by cummingsjc »

As stated, the Buddy 50 and 125 are almost indistinguishable from each other minus a few minor details, specifically the muffler shield and exhaust pipe. If you can find a used Buddy 125, you won't be unhappy. If you are patient, you can normally get one with low miles for around $1000+. You will be very happy with it. I agree with DeeDee that the Buddy 125 is probably the best scooter that you can buy for the money.
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Post by dan v. »

I agree. My '06 buddy 125 has about 14,000 miles and it has been bulletproof. Last year, before a trip to the Black Hills of South Dakota I replaced the tires again, but the first time for belt and rollers. The original parts were still like new, but I replaced them anyway with OEM parts.

The Buddy 125 can handle all the hills in the Black Hills, and the mountains in the Smoky Mountain area - will slow down in the long uphill pulls, but will do it handily.

If you like your Buddy 50, you will love the 125. Hands down, it is the most fun and best buy of any similar sized scoot in the US.

Some of you old timer around this forum will remember TVB and his travels on his 50. He was adamant about never needing more than his Buddy 50. Well, I see him around town on his Buddy 125 - he loves it!
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

I agree that the Buddy 125 is a great scooter - good performer, reliable, and cost effective. We've had ours since 2007. One thing to consider as your wife is smaller than most. Seat height of the 50, 125, and 170i are essentially the same. Seat height of the 125 Buddy Kick is actually a little lower.
sc00ter
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Post by sc00ter »

Buddy 125 is the best band for your buck. I've owned 2 (I had one and my wife had one) and we loved them. I now have a Piaggio Liberty 150. If it was just me, and not my wife and I riding 2 up, I would have purchased another Buddy 125. Never ridden the Buddy 170 so I have no comments on its performance, but its still a Genuine product so it can't be bad.
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eggsalad
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Post by eggsalad »

In case you hadn't considered this thought...

In Washington state, any licensed driver can operate a 50, but anything bigger than that requires a motorcycle license.
TTaM
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Post by TTaM »

eggsalad wrote:In case you hadn't considered this thought...

In Washington state, any licensed driver can operate a 50, but anything bigger than that requires a motorcycle license.
We're well aware of this. It was the same way in MN when we bought the 50. I've had my M license for a long time now, and the only reason my wife doesn't is she has never had a scooter big enough for the test, and my motorcycle was way too big.

We would have bought a larger scooter then, but in MN 50s get Moped plates which allow them to park anywhere bicycles can, which is a huge plus when commuting in a city where parking can be $20+ a day for a car.
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

eggsalad wrote:In Washington state, any licensed driver can operate a 50, but anything bigger than that requires a motorcycle license.
To say it a different way, anything bigger requires a safety and skills course which will make you a better, and safer, rider. I would suggest that anyone planning to own and ride a 50 still take the MSF basic course for their own benefit.
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eggsalad
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Post by eggsalad »

Dooglas wrote:
eggsalad wrote:In Washington state, any licensed driver can operate a 50, but anything bigger than that requires a motorcycle license.
To say it a different way, anything bigger requires a safety and skills course which will make you a better, and safer, rider. I would suggest that anyone planning to own and ride a 50 still take the MSF basic course for their own benefit.
I think that depends where you live. In Nevada, you can take the MSF course which essentially gives you an "M" endorsement. You just take your certificate to the DMV and done.

OR, you can simply take a road test, and no "safety and skills course". Pass it and get a license.
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

eggsalad wrote:I think that depends where you live. In Nevada, you can take the MSF course which essentially gives you an "M" endorsement. You just take your certificate to the DMV and done.

OR, you can simply take a road test, and no "safety and skills course". Pass it and get a license.
I think you missed my point. In most states there are ways to avoid taking the MSF basic course or equivalent. I was suggesting that an individual would be better served by actually taking a "safety and skills" course whether required or not.
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eggsalad
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Post by eggsalad »

Dooglas wrote:
I think you missed my point.
Yes, apparently I did. My apologies.
TTaM
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Post by TTaM »

Dooglas wrote:
eggsalad wrote:I think that depends where you live. In Nevada, you can take the MSF course which essentially gives you an "M" endorsement. You just take your certificate to the DMV and done.

OR, you can simply take a road test, and no "safety and skills course". Pass it and get a license.
I think you missed my point. In most states there are ways to avoid taking the MSF basic course or equivalent. I was suggesting that an individual would be better served by actually taking a "safety and skills" course whether required or not.
WA changed their laws, and as of Jan 1 2020, you need to take a safety course, written test, and skills test just to get your permit. That expires in 180 days. You then need to take another written test and skills test to get your M endorsement, or you can renew your permit. You can only hold 2 permits over a 5 year period.

My wife is registered for her course in June.
:nerd:
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Point37
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Post by Point37 »

this may help...
http://cycle-ergo.com/

i guess it depends on what your riding purposes are...if you're just riding around town the 125 will do the job...if any highway riding is being done go larger...a few other possible options...seat heights in inches are in parentheses...if it were me with a height constraint i would be looking at the buddy and the pcx as well as the grom if i wanted to shift

genuine
buddy 125 (29.7)

honda
pcx (29.8 )
sh150i (31.8 )
helix (26)

yamaha
vino 125 (30)
zuma 125 (31.4)

if you want to shift...
honda
grom (29.8 )
monkey (30.5)
super cub (30.7)

kawasaki
z125 (31.7)

little more power to shift...
yamaha
tw200 (31.6) [very fun...i've owned 1 and miss it]
'10 Triumph Bonneville SE (sold), '00 Yamaha TW200 (sold), '08 Husqvarna SM510R (sold), '05 Honda CBR 600RR (sold), '03 Honda CBR 600RR (sold)
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

Point37 wrote:I guess it depends on what your riding purposes are...if you're just riding around town the 125 will do the job...if any highway riding is being done go larger...a few other possible options...seat heights in inches are in parentheses...if it were me with a height constraint i would be looking at the buddy and the pcx as well as the grom if i wanted to shift

genuine
buddy 125 (29.7)

honda
pcx (29.8 )

etc
You left one out.

genuine
buddy kick (28.5)

8)
TTaM
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Post by TTaM »

New scoot acquired. Yesterday a Blackjack followed us home. My wife is still in the process of obtaining her motorcycle endorsement, so for now its my ride. I can't believe the performance of this little 150.

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birdmove
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Post by birdmove »

Dooglas wrote:
eggsalad wrote:In Washington state, any licensed driver can operate a 50, but anything bigger than that requires a motorcycle license.
To say it a different way, anything bigger requires a safety and skills course which will make you a better, and safer, rider. I would suggest that anyone planning to own and ride a 50 still take the MSF basic course for their own benefit.


They let my wife take the motorcycle riding test on one of the original Honda Metro 49cc scooters. It was funny, because when a bunch of the people there that day found out they could take the test on a 49cc Honda Metro, they asked my wife if she'd let them take the test on her Metro. She said sure. And they did. One guy had a full dress Good Wing. He was very worried about riding it through the cones. One guy was a burly Harley rider! They asked her afterwards if they could buy her some gas. She said, no thanks, since that Metro got 115 mpg, they probably only used a thimble full. We lived in Puyallup at that time. Your wife should be able to take the test on her 49cc Buddy too.
Jon in Keaau, Hawaii
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JettaKnight
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Post by JettaKnight »

birdmove wrote: They let my wife take the motorcycle riding test on one of the original Honda Metro 49cc scooters. It was funny, because when a bunch of the people there that day found out they could take the test on a 49cc Honda Metro, they asked my wife if she'd let them take the test on her Metro. She said sure. And they did. One guy had a full dress Good Wing. He was very worried about riding it through the cones. One guy was a burly Harley rider! They asked her afterwards if they could buy her some gas. She said, no thanks, since that Metro got 115 mpg, they probably only used a thimble full. We lived in Puyallup at that time. Your wife should be able to take the test on her 49cc Buddy too.
The sad thing is those guys _should_ be able to complete those tests on their bike; they just lack the skills.

They just have to practice more instead of cruising on highways.
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

JettaKnight wrote:The sad thing is those guys _should_ be able to complete those tests on their bike; they just lack the skills.

They just have to practice more instead of cruising on highways.
While I agree, I also note that it requires quite a bit of experience and skill to take a Goldwing or full dress Harley through the cones on one of those MSF courses.

Some of the Goldwing clubs get their members together for Sunday afternoon parking lot practice sessions - slalom, swerving, braking, etc. Good stuff.
birdmove
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Post by birdmove »

I remember my wife said the Gold Wing rider said with all the fairings etc, he wouldn't be able trump see the cones.
I was at work that dsy, but the vision of these bikers, and at least one typical Harley rider toodling around on my wife's blue hibiscus Metro with their knees hitting the handlebars, is priceless.
Jon in Keaau, Hawaii
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