Stella Specific Rubber Bits

The original 2-stroke Genuine scooter and its 4-stroke manual and automatic offspring

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whereshaldo
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Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:41 pm
Location: Seattle

Stella Specific Rubber Bits

Post by whereshaldo »

I'm looking for a couple little rubber bits and am wondering if they are available or if I'm better using heat shrink and some liquid electrical tape. I'm having issues with it shorting out in the rain.

First is the boot coming out of the Coil that insulates the spark plug lead.

Second is a green wire that goes into the back end of the engine and makes a right angle turn.

The third is a short blue wire that runs out of a small black square box on the top of the fan housing (is this the CDI?)

Are these boots available or should I just get creative?

Hal
milly
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Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:31 am
Location: U.K.

Post by milly »

Most rubber bits are available. You can buy a bag of all rubber bits needed. I got vespa due to the rubber quality being better
2003stellaDave
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Post by 2003stellaDave »

Try:

Scooter mercato

http://www.scootermercato.com

Or SIP in Germany:

https://www.sip-scootershop.com/

SIP has a catalog, available online as a pdf download, that is fun to look through and shows what is available.

https://www.sip-scootershop.com/en/main ... 2973afb562
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johnk
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Post by johnk »

Here's a video from That Scooter Thing that will identify the engine-side electricals. I believe the black box you're talking about is just a wiring junction, and the right-angle boot on the back (going into the gearbox) is for the neutral indicator.

If the scooter is shorting out in the rain, I would suspect the coil. I had a bad connection on the coil that prevented my 2T from running, and the boot there was torn open. I replaced the connecting hardware, crimped it down, and covered it in heatshrink.

Dielectric grease (AKA silicone paste) is also good for protecting connections from moisture. Another sort of hack is to carry a mini bottle of WD-40, which will disperse water from electrical connections.

Good on you for riding in the rain!
whereshaldo
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Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:41 pm
Location: Seattle

Post by whereshaldo »

The hope is that this scoot will replace the Honda Passport that I've ridden the last 3 years in Seattle year round. I missed two days yesterday for black ice and 6" of snow, but otherwise the expectation is that I ride every day regardless of the weather. I"ve put on about 6K miles in 3 years of urban riding, with the top speed (40mph) of the Honda being the limiting factor to using it even more.

In addition to a little more power, I'm excited by the prospect of a proper lap blanket that will keep me and hopefully the seat dry. Anyone have experience with these?

Hal
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