Riding in the Rain

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ucandoit
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Riding in the Rain

Post by ucandoit »

Are there any tips for riding in the rain?
For the first time I got caught in a major rain storm and ended up having to ride on through until I got home. Traffic was light and I felt pretty safe about that.
I was soaked and wondered how all that water would affect the Buddy, but it started up the next day with no problem and is running fine.
I slowed to around 40 and was very slow on the few curves. One car blinked it's light at me which reminded me to put my light on high beam, hoping that would help. I just have a regular head light bulb. The original.
Didn't need to brake much, but they felt okay.
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wheelbender6
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Post by wheelbender6 »

A windshield helps a lot (when you are moving).
Last edited by wheelbender6 on Mon Jul 23, 2018 3:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Mike1nw
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Post by Mike1nw »

3/4 or full face helmet helps too. Especially since I have to wear glasses.

I haven't ridden Buddy in the rain, but my Burgman has been in downpours. It kept chugging along, no problems.

You WILL get wet. Unless you have a zillion-dollar rainsuit.

Just take it easy with the brakes. And stay off the center of the lane, that's where oil etc reside.
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Point37
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Post by Point37 »

if you’re going fast the rain can sting so cover any exposed skin...full face helmet (as mentioned)...plexus on the visor to shed the water so you can see...turn your head to the side to get the water to shed off an untreated shield if you’re going fast enough...stay towards the crown of the road to prevent hydroplaning...make sure your tires are good...use engine braking as much as you can but feather the brake repeatedly so it actuates the brake light to flash so drivers can see you...when riding on milled wet pavement let it go where it wants so long as it’s not sending you off the road (stuff will make your butthole pucker)
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DeeDee
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Post by DeeDee »

I second the vote on a windshield. That and a shield on your helmet goes a long way. I keep a Frogg Toggs suit under my seat. I won't head out during rain, but if it rains in the midst of a ride, so be it.
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Post by New2Scoots »

Be gentle with the front brake if you're going 60+. I'm not sure if 10" wheels are easy to hydroplane but 19" wheels are. Going 65 in a thunderstorm, used the front brake & the front wheel went full lock to the left. I stomped my boot to stay upright. Slid sideways past the car in front of me just as he turned left. That was 1983 & I haven't ridden in the rain since.
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skipper20
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Re: Riding in the Rain

Post by skipper20 »

ucandoit wrote:Are there any tips for riding in the rain?
For the first time I got caught in a major rain storm and ended up having to ride on through until I got home. Traffic was light and I felt pretty safe about that.
I was soaked and wondered how all that water would affect the Buddy, but it started up the next day with no problem and is running fine.
I slowed to around 40 and was very slow on the few curves. One car blinked it's light at me which reminded me to put my light on high beam, hoping that would help. I just have a regular head light bulb. The original.
Didn't need to brake much, but they felt okay.
What rain? Been dry as a bone here since April. And not a drop in sight.

Bill in Seattle
ucandoit
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Post by ucandoit »

Thank you for all the responses. Really helpful tips.
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charlie55
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Post by charlie55 »

From my point of view, when it comes to inclement weather it's the one thing you can't control that poses more, or at least as much of a threat as those you can.....and that means drivers.

Very few of them understand the physics and limitations of two-wheeled vehicles on wet surfaces. The need for things like reducing speed, cornering more gently, navigating deep puddles more cautiously, etc., are apparently not intuitive to most of our four-wheeled brethren.

The result, around here at least, is usually tailgating, dangerous passing, increased aggressive driving and the like. Not a very pleasant situation to be in when you're doing your best to remain upright.

As I have the luxury of choice, my rule of thumb is to take the cage if the forecast for rain is 30% or greater, or if there's any chance of snow or ice.
Unexpected bad weather is another story of course.
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Dooglas
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Post by Dooglas »

DeeDee wrote:I keep a Frogg Toggs suit under my seat.
So do I. One of those excellent "just in case" sort of things.
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Post by BigDaddy SnakeOiler »

New2Scoots wrote:...not sure if 10" wheels are easy to hydroplane but 19" wheels are.
Motorcycle and scooter tires are not wide enough to hydroplane.
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Point37
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Post by Point37 »

BigDaddy SnakeOiler wrote:
New2Scoots wrote:...not sure if 10" wheels are easy to hydroplane but 19" wheels are.
Motorcycle and scooter tires are not wide enough to hydroplane.
yea that's not true...a quick youtube search will provide proof
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Post by sc00ter »

I got pounded down on so bad last night that I hid under a bank drive thru until it slowed down! I was going to take the interstate but ended up taking the surface streets. Only takes an extra 10 minutes and I have the option to hide if needed. I didnt have my Frogg Toggs on, just a short sleeve. Kept my speeds around 50mph and paid attention to the road for ponding. Oh, and I was wearing a turtle helmet without the clear shield. Rain sucks but is a fact of life. Just use common sense, unlike me who thought they could make it and end up getting soaked for 16 miles!
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Point37
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Post by Point37 »

DeeDee wrote:I keep a Frogg Toggs suit under my seat.
how durable and breathable are these?...i'm debating on getting a new set of foul weather gear for work...i have full rubber stuff that is very heavy, hot and non-breathable but very durable and always keep me dry
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JettaKnight
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Re: Riding in the Rain

Post by JettaKnight »

ucandoit wrote:Are there any tips for riding in the rain?
For the first time I got caught in a major rain storm and ended up having to ride on through until I got home. Traffic was light and I felt pretty safe about that.
I was soaked and wondered how all that water would affect the Buddy, but it started up the next day with no problem and is running fine.
I slowed to around 40 and was very slow on the few curves. One car blinked it's light at me which reminded me to put my light on high beam, hoping that would help. I just have a regular head light bulb. The original.
Didn't need to brake much, but they felt okay.
Rain sucks when scootin'.

Remember, the road is slickest when the rain starts and washes up all the oil and debris. Any painted surface will be dangerously slick. Otherwise, it's not as bad as you think, just be aware of reduced traction.


Also, you should normally have you high beam on during the day. Switch to low at night.
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DeeDee
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Post by DeeDee »

Point37 wrote:
DeeDee wrote:I keep a Frogg Toggs suit under my seat.
how durable and breathable are these?...i'm debating on getting a new set of foul weather gear for work...i have full rubber stuff that is very heavy, hot and non-breathable but very durable and always keep me dry

If you get the heavier lined set, they are fairly durable, and really breathable. I think they are great for the money. Almost like a real thin flannel lined tyvek. I've seen them at Walmart.
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Point37
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Post by Point37 »

DeeDee wrote:
Point37 wrote:
DeeDee wrote:I keep a Frogg Toggs suit under my seat.
how durable and breathable are these?...i'm debating on getting a new set of foul weather gear for work...i have full rubber stuff that is very heavy, hot and non-breathable but very durable and always keep me dry

If you get the heavier lined set, they are fairly durable, and really breathable. I think they are great for the money. Almost like a real thin flannel lined tyvek. I've seen them at Walmart.
great...thanks...i'll have to check out a set of these
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Post by BuddyRaton »

One habit I have gotten myself into...rain or shine...is to not put my feet down on pavement markings. Those big turn arrows, stop bars etc painted onto the asphalt can get mighty slippery underfoot.

Since I don't do it in the dry it's just one more thing I don't have to think about in the rain with enough other stuff going on in the wet.

They are also slippery on tires for braking and accelerating. I had the rear wheel kick out a bit once or twice a bit. Nope...can't help riding over some of those markers but I do stay more aware of them.
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Post by BuddyRaton »

Oh yeah...toll booths can be slippery as snot on a doorknob too!
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ucandoit
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Post by ucandoit »

One person wrote to use the high beam during the day and the low beam at night. I did not know this.

Also, I notice that Mitch, who does Youtube videos on Buddy scooters, uses a H4 12v 60/55W bulb to replace the original head light bulb in the 125 Buddy.

Do others recommend this? It does have a higher wattage and I do not want any electrical problems.
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Post by KABarash »

ucandoit wrote:One person wrote to use the high beam during the day and the low beam at night. I did not know this.
I do that for two reasons. Firstly, I'd presume it can help make you more visible in daylight. Second, if one bulb filament burns out before the other, I'd prefer it to be the high beam because then I can still ride at night without blinding oncoming traffic and I'm not the biggest fan of the Hi-beam light pattern at night, it produces an odd dark spot on the road in front of the scoot.
ucandoit wrote:Also, I notice that Mitch, who does Youtube videos on Buddy scooters, uses a H4 12v 60/55W bulb to replace the original head light bulb in the 125 Buddy.

Do others recommend this? It does have a higher wattage and I do not want any electrical problems.
I'd be afraid the higher wattage would create too much heat and damage the headlight housing. In the nine years of ownership of my Buddy I've only had to replace my headlight bulb once, I stuck with the stock 35/35 watt.
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Post by JettaKnight »

KABarash wrote:I do that for two reasons. Firstly, I'd presume it can help make you more visible in daylight. Second, if one bulb filament burns out before the other, I'd prefer it to be the high beam because then I can still ride at night without blinding oncoming traffic and I'm not the biggest fan of the Hi-beam light pattern at night, it produces an odd dark spot on the road in front of the scoot.

I'd be afraid the higher wattage would create too much heat and damage the headlight housing. In the nine years of ownership of my Buddy I've only had to replace my headlight bulb once, I stuck with the stock 35/35 watt.
Correct on both accounts.
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Post by anamoto »

riding in a rain is no problem if you have a good control along with waterproof biker gear 8)
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